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Tuesday, February 9, 2016

It's Black History & Women in Horror Month: The Bloggers

Blogging is known in many forms; a creative outlet, business, book foundation, news source, or all the above. When you're putting love into it, the hard work alone is rewarding, its lasting impact, astounding. In the spirit of creating a consistent brand in the most do-it-yourself way possible, having a blog means you're thinking on your toes even when you're sleeping. 

The online horror community fits right in to these sentiments. And while those engaged know where to go for their news, I'm not confident that the majority are aware that women of color are building their own body of meaningful work to add to the variety of perspectives horror has always thrived upon. Below are five older and newer Black women horror bloggers out there to cape for. 



Since 2012, Wicker Girl has been sharing her travels to great locations where sects of horror creations were birthed, interviews, and her general love of the genre dating back to her first 8 years on the planet with some gory stories she'd read for her young classmates that her English teacher found unsavory. Her thoughtful pieces range from her avid enjoyment of supernatural-inspired novels to brief examinations of films such as Freaks (1932).  She resides in London with a healthy work ethic and consistently fun tales from FrightFest to chats with horror writers like Kim Newman and even actress Amber Benson.





Angela Harris (The Overthinker) is probably one of my favorite, new bloggers on the block. Overthinking Horror Films offers brief, fun snapshots of some of her favorite horror films with observations that invite horror novices to consider technical aspects of filmmaking that the genre has defined. You can also find film reviews and cases that may affirm or reject ideas you may have had about a macabre tale. Angela believes that "horror can offer viewers great insight to human nature, a different way of thinking about things, and a deeper understanding of cultural trends."




It's been four plus years since New York native turned Florida resident Zena Sade Dixon titled her confident brand and brought to horror not only her passion for the independent scene but her unique convergence of fashion/style with the genre. The Real Queen Of Horror has garnered considerable attention from other online horror outlets throughout its tenure, fueled by Zena's infectious authenticity. Her talents include videography, filmmaking, and editing, which has seamlessly found its way into making Real Queen Of Horror an interactive experience along with witty musings and a highly creative vlog channel with brand new videos coming soon. Be sure to check out her Upcoming Horrors series each month!





Pixie has put five years of amazing energy into the first active horror blog created by a Black woman that I have come across. Besides a variety of film reviews, Pixie also delves into humor with a Survival Guide from a Mad Black Woman in a Zombie Apocalypse and gives a history lesson on the Tokoloshes (a.k.a. the "African gremlins"). Although life, like with many of us, caught up with her and publishing consistently became an issue, Pixie has been spotted in 2015 with a brand new vlog that I hope to see continued.





Stretching the terrain of the North American perspective on horror, the other woman known as Pixie brings her Canadian charm into her passion for the genre with a breadth of coverage from her hometown's booming scene, SyFy's Face/Off recaps, interviews with genre filmmakers, and isn't shy about sharing her feelings as a woman of color on the blocks of Canada's horror outlets. Her masterful engagement with film criticism is an experience with intelligence and always met with her balanced, personal touch. Like a shadowy whisper in the the night, cotton candy, wintry sky.


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