Wednesday, February 28, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Nicole Renee Simmons


Bio

Nicole Renee has been into horror films for as long as she could remember. Starting off with writing short horror stories with her grandfather, she instantly became intrigued with horror and fear. It wasn't until she turned 17 that she figured out directing, writing, and producing horror films was her passion. After graduating from The Los Angeles Film School, she decided to further her education with a Bachelors degree in Entertainment Business from the same school. She then received her Masters Degree in Creative Writing from Full Sail University. Her obsession, knowledge, and pride in horror, has grown to a new level. Entering film school made her completely accept her passion and learn to humble, mold, and better her own craft of horror. She’s grown a huge following on MoviePilot.com, reviewing horror films, TV, and books. She is the founder of her own film production company, ItsFearHerself. (Source)

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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Naledi Jackson


Bio

Naledi Jackson is a director, screenwriter and producer, currently based in Toronto. She was born in Vancouver (Canada) to South African and Canadian parents and was raised in Zimbabwe. She returned to Canada to study visual arts in Montreal, after which she moved to Toronto to focus on film and television production. She studied Fine Art at Concordia University. (Source)

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Monday, February 26, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Rae Shaw


Bio

Rae Shaw is an author, producer-director and educator creating diverse and provocative narratives across disciplines of visual media, fiction/non-fiction, and poetry. Her work has explored and investigated stories of diversity, disparity and connection. She's a graduate of the University of Chicago's English Literature and Language Department and University of Miami's Motion Picture Program. In 2014, Rae's feature script, The Repass became a quarterfinalist for the esteemed Academy Nicholl Fellowship. She is developing a web series pilot titled, Black Kungfu Chick which is a story about a young girl from South L.A. who learns kung-fu from her premed teacher so she can protect her community. Additionally, Rae is a member of the University of Chicago Alumni Association, Organization of Black Screenwriters, ACLU, and Reel Ladies. She splits her time between Los Angeles and New York. (Source)

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Sunday, February 25, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Misty Dawn


Bio

Midwesterner Misty Dawn is the writer/director of Hooker Assassin. She's been a fan of the horror genre for 25 years. At a young age I would sneak down into the living room after bedtime to watch USA Up All Night, and MonsterVision with Joe Bob Briggs.

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Saturday, February 24, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Raeshelle Cooke


Bio

Raeshelle Cooke is an award-winning filmmaker & founder of production company RMC Pictures. She enjoys writing about the many misadventures of love and additionally conceptualizes stories for and directs music videos. (Source)

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Friday, February 23, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Eboni Boykin


Bio

Eboni Boykin is a Columbia University graduate with work experience credits that include the Melissa Harris-Perry Show, CNN, Lifetime Movie Network, as well as Women and Hollywood. Her journey has been featured on platforms such as NewsOne, MSNBC, and more. She additionally works on staff at a women's shelter and advocates for poverty alleviation and economic empowerment. She is currently getting more of her horror-themed film projects off the ground.

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Alessandra Pinkston


Bio

Resiliancy seems to be just one of the words actress, writer, and award-winning filmmaker Alessandra Pinkston stands by. Every artist understands that to fully persue your craft takes an almost inhuman amount of patience and double the effort. Alessandra not only has an inspirational reminder etched on her arm, the Chicago native is currently navigating Los Angeles with television network appearances and her own film production space, KindredQuest, Inc., a map for diverse, leading roles in genre projects.

I’ve been loving horror films since I was a child. The first horror film that intrigued me when I was a little girl was The People Under The Stairs, I had never seen a person of color be the lead in a horror film. My family and I always watched that film. I’ve seen that movie so many times I lost count. Then my family became hooked on Candyman. Although People was something that caught my eye, my family and I focused on Candyman because it was shot in Chicago, my hometown. So we would see certain buildings and it resonated with us because it was where we were from. Not only that, but there was this tall, eerie Black man who was the villain. That, I had never seen before. I thought it was awesome seeing people that looked like me star in those kinds of films.
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Wednesday, February 21, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: England Simpson


Bio

England is an exceptional film/television actress and producer, having appeared in over two dozen independent film projects and starring in the truTV series, Southern Fried Stings. Building a reputation as a blerd (black nerd), England has garnered thousands of fans with her goofy attitude and passion for all things geeky. When England is not dusting potato chip crumbs off of her fat face she is busy taking charge of production, post-production and creative direction, for a handful of production companies as well as watching movies (especially indie & horror) and dressing up as obscure comic book/anime characters. (Source)

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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Somica Spratley


Bio

Originally from Virginia, Somica Spratley now resides & works as a makeup artist in Birmingham, Alabama. Though mostly self-taught, she has received training from MAC Cosmetics, Ryder Makeup Labs, private instruction and continuing education in special makeup effects. She was featured as a beauty editor in Prysm Magazine, has contributed to numerous local films and music videos and is seasonally employed for events like Birmingham’s coveted Witches' Ball. In addition to makeup artistry, Somica studies film & media production and made her directorial debut at the 18th Annual Sidewalk Film Festival with her short film, Altschmerz which would go on to win Best Editing at the 2016/2017 Stormy Weather Horror Fest. As of September 2017, Somica is one of the elite who holds membership with The Unions Local 798 for makeup artists & hair stylists and strives to further develop her aesthetic as a genre-focused artist. (Source)

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Monday, February 19, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Monique Dupree


Bio

Actress Monique Dupree is often referred to affectionately as THA ORIGINAL GATA™. She has become an underground cultural icon, towing the line between independent /genre film leading lady and the fringe of the mainstream. Loved, hated, often challenged, she continues to infect the very bloodstream of the horror/ sci-fi universe on every media level with her dominating presence and tireless work effort. You can find Monique Dupree’s films online or in stores such as Walmart, Target, FYE, Food Lion & many other locations. Monique Dupree has done over 70 film projects to date. (Source)


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Sunday, February 18, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Bree Newsome


Bio

Bree Newsome is an is an American filmmaker, musician, speaker, and activist from Charlotte, North Carolina. She is best known for removing the Confederate flag from the South Carolina state house grounds. The resulting publicity put pressure on state officials to remove the flag permanently, and it was taken down for good on July 10, 2015. While still in high school, Newsome created a short animated film for which she won a college scholarship. She studied film at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts and her short, Wake has won numerous awards, including the Outstanding Independent Short Film award in the Black Reel Awards of 2012 and the Best Short Film at the BET Urban World Film Festival. It has been screened at many film festivals including the 63rd annual Cannes Film Festival in France, the New York International Latino Film Festival, and the Montreal International Black Film Festival. Newsome was the first African-American undergraduate to be nominated for the prestigious Wasserman Award (Spike Lee having won the award as a graduate student). She says that her experience as a black woman working in the horror and sci-fi film genres inspired her to become an activist. Speaking as part of a panel at Spelman College in 2014, she said, "The space that exists for many of us, as a young black girl, is so extremely limited so that you really can’t go very far without being an activist, without being in defiance of something." (Source)

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Saturday, February 17, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Monika Estrella Negra

Photo by Eva Wo
Bio

Chicago native Monika Estrella Negra is the co-founder of Audre's Revenge Film, a multimedia verse dedicated to the visibility, subjectivity, humanity, and narratives of QTIBIPOC people in horror and science fiction. She's also the founder of the Black and Brown Punk Show Chicago that has garnered national acclaim. She spends an immense amount of effort as an avid reader, community organizer and budding screenwriter/filmmaker. She envisions the world as a giant film, with narratives begging to be told. (Source)

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Friday, February 16, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Monica Moore-Suriyage


Bio

Monica spent most of her life thinking she would be a doctor, but then she realized she's not a fan of blood unless it's made of red dye and corn syrup. She switched her focus to movies and graduated with a degree in Film and Media Arts from Temple University. Monica's mission as a director is to create content featuring diversity as second nature. Monica tends to sway towards horror/thriller and stories that feature women trying to survive larger than life situations. She hopes viewers have as much fun watching her films as she does making them. (Source)

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Calisha A. Russ


Bio

Writer/director Calisha A. Russ is the rebellious one. Born of Grenadian parents, Calisha galavanted through the streets of Brooklyn sculpting her street smarts and her love of the landscape. A horror buff, the filmmaking bug bit her as a P.A. on set of a slasher film in 2012. Since then, she has lent her visual talents to weddings, live performances and lifestyle videos. In 2015, she landed her first credit as Director of Photography on a trailer for a mock biopic on the R&B group, New Edition. You can find Calisha rapidly reciting rap lyrics in her car while being stuck in Atlanta traffic or meditating on the fascinating chaos of life. (Source)

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Tiffany D. Jackson


Bio

Brooklyn native currently residing with her adorable chihuahua Oscar, Tiffany D. Jackson is a NAACP Image Award-nominated author and awkward black girl 24/7. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Film from Howard University and her Master of Arts in Media Studies from The New School University. She has over a decade of experience in the television industry, working for various networks and media companies including National Geographic (focused on documentaries such as Lockdown, a prison subculture series) Roc Nation, BET, FUSE, BBC AMERICA, and EPIX. From managing live events, concerts, festival showcases such as BET AWARDS and SXSW Music Show Case, to TV series, specials, and pilots such as FUSE: TOP 20 Countdown, Trending 10, The Hustle: After Party Live and in-studio concert series to producing hip-hop documentaries and artist promotional spots. In 2009, she wrote and directed the short horror film, The Field Trip, receiving praise in the film festival circuit. She is a lover of naps, cookie dough, and beaches, and if often found most likely multitasking. (Source)

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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Re-Routing The Horrific & The Black Subject In Film With Dianca London Potts


Black horror. An entity of its own, mattering the pulse of the film industry specific for this conversation, is undeniably revolutionary. Its launching pad for the world, where more eyes are fixated on it now more than ever is Get Out (2017). A film that has shattered records financially, critically, and further, in prestigious recognition and beyond, writer Dianca London reminds us that writer/director Jordan Peele created a film that flawlessly "tears the veil between the reality of blackness and how it is imagined through the gaze of whiteness." Get Out, a black horror film is a worldwide success that refuses the white gaze by not only centering its Black protagonist Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), but canonizing him as an example of black survival in confronting a white supremacist society.

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28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Simret Cheema-Innis


Bio

Simret is a London-based, world travelling filmmaker who graduated from Staffordshire University with a BA in Broadcast Journalism and Politics. She is an aficionado of horror and loves the supernatural and terror in film and fiction. She's performed/modelled for various alternative and horror events, films, music videos, and has interviewed many great horror authors, directors, as well has even written her own short stories. (Source)

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Monday, February 12, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Taylor Black


Bio

Atlanta's Taylor Black is the founder of Black Balance Productions, a multimedia collective that seeks to "empower, educate, and liberate the black woman through film and photography."

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Sunday, February 11, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Nikyatu Jusu


Bio

Having garnered an MFA from NYU's Tisch Graduate Film school, Sierra Leonean-American filmmaker Nikyatu Jusu's short films have played at numerous festivals. She is nationally and internationally known for being awarded NYU’s prestigious Spike Lee Fellowship Award, the Princess Grace Narrative film grant and Director’s Guild of America Honorable Mentions, Rooftop Films / Adrienne Shelly Foundation Short Film Grant and more. Three of her shorts were acquired by and aired on HBO, her most recent being Flowers which she co-wrote and co-directed. Nikyatu's feature screenplay, Free The Town was one of 12 projects invited to participate in Sundance Institute’s inaugural Diverse Writers Workshop. Additionally, Free The Town was hand selected for Africa’s most prestigious Film Market, the 2013 Durban Film Mart and one of 5 narrative films selected for Film Independent's Fast Track. With her recent win of the Tribeca Film Institute and Chanel funded initiative Through Her Lens, Nikyatu is in pre-production on her narrative film Suicide By Sunlight(Source)

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Saturday, February 10, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Maria Wilson


Bio

Maria Wilson trained in the experimental theatre wing at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. Her recent acting work includes several independent films and an off-broadway theatrical run. Her award-winning debut short film Venefica has played at over 25 festivals around the world and is now available online via Shudder. As a portrait and editorial photographer, her work has been featured in MR Magazine, Buzzfeed, and Interview. (Source)

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Friday, February 9, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: L.C. Cruell


Bio

Lucy L.C. Cruell is a director of festival award-winning short films, a critically acclaimed web series, and writer on numerous recognized feature screenplays, pilots and shorts. Cruell is additionally an author of 25 published short stories, a film critic at multiple publications, attorney, freelance writer/editor, entrepreneur, and member of Women in Film and Television, Science Fiction Writers of America, Mensa, Triple 9, The Organization of Black Screenwriters and an American Association of University Women Professional Fellow, a James Clyburn Fellow and a NATPE Diversity Fellow. she was just named 1 of the 11 Inaugural Shudder Labs Fellows for her latest project Un-Seen and is the creator of the in-development horror anthology with an all black woman writing/directing team, 7 Magpies. She is an honors graduate of both Duke University and Harvard Law School. Her first feature Cemetery Tales is currently on the festival circuit. (Source)

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Thursday, February 8, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Tristian Montgomery


Bio

Tristian Montgomery is a director, agitator, and Jedi with a BA in Cinema Art & Science from Columbia College Chicago where she currently resides working with O'Keefe Reinhard & Paul.

Horror is such an important genre to me as a fan because I can always count on it to make me feel something. [It] brings people together by exploiting the things that freak them out. With horror I can embrace the shadows and manipulate what people see.

More about Tristian can be read here.

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Wednesday, February 7, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Kristina Leath-Malin


Bio

Kristina Leath-Malin is a filmmaker, scholar, screenwriter, and digital artist from Detroit who lives in Brooklyn, NY. She has recently completed her second and terminal graduate degree (M.F.A.) at Long Island University in Media Studies with her work My Final Girl: The Black Women of American Horror, and first began her graduate voyage in feminist horror theory with her M.A. published thesis/book, Objectification Repackaged: The Women of 21st Century French Horror. She has traveled through Europe with a performance group and landed in Paris where she began writing. Scripting and having ideas inspired her to return to graduate school after making several short films, wanting to truly understand the mechanics of meaning in cinema. In addition to her film efforts, she has curated four multimedia art exhibitions in New York City. Currently, she is building her internet research and information database for My Final Girl and recently premiered her feminist take on the Stephen King “Dollar Baby” One For The Road (the sequel to Salem’s Lot). Her next project will be based on the mythology of Lillith, the first wife of Adam. (Source)


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Tuesday, February 6, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Meosha Bean


Bio

Meosha Bean is an award winning actress/filmmaker from Gainesville, Florida. Voted best upcoming director in 2012 at the New Jersey Film Festival, Meosha started filming and acting at 7. After attending acting and modeling school, she moved on to feature films, music videos and promotional work. She is the owner of M.V.B Films which was established in 2003, her projects are primarily horror/thriller, action, and drama. Meosha's popular YouTube channel has over three million views and counting with about15,000 subscribers. Meosha's short, Miss Pepper (2013) is one of her most viewed films. She has worked with many people in the business and indie talents, among them Roy Jones Jr., Keyshia Cole, Chris Brown, Billy Idol, and Ron Bass who has made clothes worn by Beyonce and Jay Z. (Source)

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Monday, February 5, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Lary Love Dolley


Bio

Actress/writer/model/vocalist/DIY filmmaker Lary Love Dolley, a.k.a. "The Evil I" runs the micro-blog, Blood of Ganja where she highlights Black women in horror. She is one of hardest working emerging scream queens/screenwriters in the horror industry, having made appearances in many mediums from grindcore & punk bands, independent films, magazines to TV, most notably HBO's Treme. Additionally, she had a part in The Butcher, a short horror film by Filmbalaya Films and her self -produced film Ectoplasm did the film festival circuit. The way Lary puts it, "...people need to seriously recognize that black women are not a monolithic group regardless of what the media constantly attempts to perpetuate. That is why we have to tell our own stories."

She is from Memphis, TN and is currently based out of New Orleans, Louisiana.

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Sunday, February 4, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: P. Sam Kessie


Bio

Emerging British-Ghanaian filmmaker P. Sam Kessie holds a BFA degree in Media Production from the American InterContinental University in Atlanta, GA. Her senior thesis thriller short, Sales Day caused a stir on campus and won first place at the school's video festival and the media department’s Outstanding Student Award. Kessie has since been collecting accolades and recognition for her narrative, documentary, and music video work. In 2012, Kessie participated in the 5th Talent Campus Durban (part of the Berlinale Talent Campus during the 33rd Durban International Film Festival) in South Africa and her debut feature script, Unbalanced- a psychological mystery, was one of five scripts selected for their 1st Produire Au Sud Script Studio workshop. She is currently in postproduction for a mystery suspense and an experimental horror piece as well as collaborating with others artists on shorts and features projects.

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Saturday, February 3, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Kellee Terrell


Bio

Kellee Terrell is an award winning filmmaker and journalist from Chicago who writes about race, gender, health and pop culture. Her articles and interviews have been featured in Essence, The Advocate, Hello Beautiful, Vogue, Al-Jazeera, The Root and Harper's Bazaar. Her short films, Goodnight My Love and Blame have screened in over 60 film festivals around the world including the Academy Award qualifying Cinequest Film Festival and Athens International Film & Video Film Festival. In 2016, she was named one of Outfest's Screenwriting Lab Fellows for her first feature script Gemma, a Black lesbian ghost love horror story. (Source)

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Friday, February 2, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: Zena S. Dixon


Bio

Originally from Yonkers, New York, Zena S. Dixon is one of the boldest and hardworking horror fans/creatives. She is the founder of Real Queen Of Horror, her brand where she writes as a horror film commentator, reviewer, graphic designer, vlogger, and podcaster. Her dedication to the genre has lead to work with iHorror, Florida Geek Scene, Wicked Horror, Black Girl Nerds, Bloody-Disgusting, and most recently, Dread Central. She is also a filmmaker with D.I.Y. and on-set experience and a healthy amount of shorts to hone her craft/style in the books. One of her most recent films, Peel, has caused a buzz on the film festival circuit and Night of the Witch is available for Amazon Prime members to watch now.

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Thursday, February 1, 2018

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers: R. Shanea Williams


Bio

R. Shanea Williams is a native of Richmond, Virginia and currently resides in Queens, New York. She graduated from the University of Virginia in 2003 with a BA in English and received her MFA in dramatic writing (with a concentration in screenwriting) from New York University in 2008. Williams was a quarterfinalist in the 2007 Slamdance Screenwriting Competition and in 2011, she was a top five screenplay finalist in the Urbanworld Film Festival Screenwriting Competition.

Her work has been featured on IndieWire, Shadow And Act, and Black Girl Nerds.

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