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#SciFiSunday: Teaser Trailer for Afronauts

I'm doing The Carlton all over the visual stimulation this teaser trailer for the short film Afronauts, written and directed by Ghanaian filmmaker Frances Bodomo. With almost a dozen films under her belt and multiple Sundance appearances, Bodomo takes her audience on a trip back in time as it "tells an alternative history of the 1960s Space Race" while simultaneously pitting them in a present and future where technology gives us the opportunity to learn true stories of African contribution in science and space exploration.

Synopsis: Inspired by true events, Afronauts tells an alternative history of the 1960s Space Race. It’s the night of July 16th 1969 and, as America prepares to send Apollo 11 to the moon, a group of exiles in the Zambian desert are rushing to launch their rocket first. They train by rolling their astronaut, 17-year-old Matha Mwamba, down hills in barrels to simulate weightlessness. As the clock counts down to blast off, as the Bantu-7 Rocket looks more and more lopsided, Matha must decide if she’s willing to die to keep her family’s myths alive. Afronauts follows the scientific zeitgeist from the perspective of those who do not have access to it.

After a successful Kickstarter campaign and some foundation funding, Afronauts made its world premiere at Sundance 2014. Until it makes its landing on a festival near you, enjoy!

Frances is on Twitter!


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