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#SciFiSunday: Afrofuturist Film, Bar Star City

Author of Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy Culture  Ytasha L. Womack is embarking on completing her first trippy feature film, Bar Star City. After reading the description for myself, I got the sensation of experiencing one of those really late night Adult Swim bumpers on a roller coaster. Or a fever dream of the Chalmun Cantina, with Black people:

A goddess, a war veteran and the captain of a spaceship meet in a bar...

We've all went to bars and met unique, quirky personalities. But what happens when seemingly ordinary people are quite extraordinary? This film follows several not so ordinary regulars of a bar that's become a home for the galactic and well-traveled.

A sci fi film with Afrofuturist themes, Bar Star City looks at love, deception, memory and alienation amongst a group of bar regulars who just want a place to call home.

For science fiction fans who dare to dream, this Bar Star City teaser produces an aesthetic; it asks questions and thrives on our curiosity with its images and soundtrack that is worth the investment.
Womack's book on the movement is an innovative read that builds a case for Afrofuturism's history, present, and daring future in our stadium of artistic expression. Bar Star City is such an exciting next step for Womack and Black science fiction cinema. Donate, share, and rave about this proposal to your clans far and wide.

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