Skip to main content

Black Girls & Horror Comics: Malice In Ovenland

What happens with a brown girl from Queens goes on a monstrous misadventure through an oven portal? Speculatively focused publishing company Rosarium is happy to announce a new comic book series from Micheline Hess titled, Malice In Ovenland!

Lily Brown is a bright, curious, energetic young girl from Queens, New York. She lives with her mom and loves reading and writing and spending time with her friends. But she hates cleaning!

So, when her mom forces her to stay home for the summer instead of going off to some fun soccer or riding camp, Lily fumes. She wanted excitement and adventure. She didn't want to do chores. Little did she know that the greasy oven in the kitchen was going to give her more excitement and adventure than she could possibly handle.

About Micheline: Born and raised in NYC, Micheline Hess does design at a prominent ad agency in Chelsea and spends her spare time developing graphic novels, short stories, and interactive iBooks for kids. She has always been fascinated by the visual narrative in books and film and is constantly endeavoring to weave her own sense of humorous story-telling into both her personal and sometimes professional work. 

Micheline is most adept at creating characters and stories that provide a safe and fun way to inspire young children. Through colorful flights of fun and fancy, she hopes to encourage a stronger sense of self-love, friendship, and a hunger to embrace all things new and different in the world around them.

Issue 1 and the newly released Issue 2 is now available. Here's a peek at number two:

The dastardly Queen of the Oven Frites finally has our poor Lilly in her greasy grasp, and NO amount of unsaturated fat will loosen her deadly grip!

Stay up to date on all Rosarium & Malice In Ovenland/Micheline news here.

Popular posts from this blog

How MIDSOMMAR Utilizes and Subverts Horror Movie Tropes of People of Color

By Mary Kay McBrayer (@mkmcbrayer)

For a film that could have been easily white-washed, Ari Aster’s Midsommar does have an inclusive cast. Before our characters are even taken to Sweden where most of the film's dread fueled action takes place, we meet them in their college town. Dani (Florence Pugh) stresses about her sister’s scary email while her boyfriend, Christian (Jack Reynor) drinks at a bar with his buddies, only one of whom is black named Josh (The Good Place's William Jackson Harper).
I have watched enough horror movies to know—and I’ve been brown enough long enough to know—that this setting does not bode well for a person of color. The token minority, say it with me, tends to die first. Because of this ratio, I expected a few other established tropes of the horror genre in Josh’s character, too, and I have to admit, I was delighted and surprised that nothing played out the way I expected.

DARKLY: At The Heart Of Goth, Is Blackness

"Horror has always been used to illuminate cultural anxieties and gives a voice to our collective fears. So, what to make of the gothic in America, a place which by the very nature of its founding is predisposed to a culture of anxiety? The dread knowing the enemy at the gate is understandable, but in America the enemy has already passed through it, and has been brought inside. The call is coming from inside the house."
-words by Leila Taylor