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#SciFiSunday: Afrofuturist Films, Part 2

I decided to split this list into a healthy handful of films that could be argued as Afrofuturist. In the digital age, there's so much more to explore in regards to Black people creating imaginative cinema. There is a relatively well rounded, diverse array of interpretations of this movement in cinema as well as a deep investment in science fiction and Afrofuturism respectively.

Part 1 gives a succinct definition of Afrofuturism. In Part 2, there are more films explore, primarily from women of color than likely ever before in the movement's film history.

Afronauts (2004)
Written & Directed by Frances Bodomo

Description: In Zambia 1969, a group of indigenous villagers work on a rocket in order to beat America by placing the first African woman on the moon.

Pumzi (2009)
Written & Directed by Wanuri Kahiu

Description: An East African survivor of the great water wars confined to subcutaneous community works against a system that wants to prevent her from bringing a germinated seed to the Earth's surface.

Chains (2010)
Written & Directed by Sharon Lewis

Description: In a deprived, underground community, Chain grows a flower, an act punishable by death.


Bar Star City (2015)
Written & Directed by Ytasha Womack

Description: Exploring the lives of individuals that are bar regulars; with experiences in space battle and war.

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