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#SciFiSunday: Brown Girl In The Ring

Nalo’s depiction of Ti-Jeanne, a young caribbean canadian girl and her fantastical world of spirits has haunted me ever since I first read the novel. As with any adaptation I had to hone in on one aspect of the story, so I went to, the beginning of the beginning, the first steps Ti-Jeanne takes towards becoming a hero. -Sharon Lewis, director

It’s 2048 in The Burn, a post-apocalyptic dystopia haunted by spirits from afro-caribbean folklore. What was once Toronto has been abandoned by the wealthy, and the poor have been walled in and left to fend for themselves. This coming of age story focuses on Ti-Jeanne who rebels against her grandmother’s mystical Caribbean teachings to run away with her first love. Haunted by warnings and predictions, Ti-Jeanne must obey her guardian spirit or someone will die.

Writer/Director Sharon Lewis criss-crosses the arenas of television, film, digital, print and theatre in a variety of roles as an award-winning director, producer and writer. Voted one of Canada’s Top Ten Women by Elle Canada, Lewis has been nominated for a Gemini and a Leo, and made history as the first Canadian woman of colour to host two national shows. She has honed her skills as a director at UCLA and the NFB. Her considerable list of film, television and theatre credits includes Chains, which she wrote, directed and produced, winner of Best Sci-Fi short at the prestigious Eugene International Film Festival.

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