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Haunting Web Series, The Ghost & The Negro

Framed for a bizarre murder, a bookstore keeper teams up with a self proclaimed ghost hunter to track down the killer.
(Source)

A blend of the southern gothic and film noir, The Ghost and The Negro is a new web series from Alabama-based creator Sylvester K. Folks (@Slyvester_Folks). In the first three episodes, we're introduced to Sydney (Demise Harp) who just appears to be a casually passionate bookstore keep whose rational disposition is challenged when strange and unfortunate circumstances lead him to a startling revelation from new bookstore regular, Hattie (Daniela Cobb).

With more details provided on the series' Facebook page, it would be easy to name drop Mulder and Scully in likeness, but I have a feeling that Folks is going to give us something much more unqiue in the way Hattie and Sydney create a compelling sleuthing supernatural duo and I'm more than intrigued to get to know these two based on two very scenes witnessed.

These mini-sodes are striking with the decisive use of black and white, enhance The Ghost and The Negro's most jarring moments. Score stings are utilized as a familiar genre convention but work extremely well. The craftsmanship in the effects are at once delightful, chilling and enrich character arcs as opposed bringing the simple wow factor. Definitely give a slither of your free time to watching this series.


Episodes 1-3 of The Ghost and The Negro are available now!

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