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Black Horror Films: SHE (2018)

Written & Directed by Zena S. Dixon

I love a good conspiracy. A cabal. One that constantly keeps me guessing. A shimmer of light as a sleek car pulls into a driveway, punctuated by the exotic plantlife that subtlly adds to the ostentatiousness. A sneaky text bubble appearing where a beautiful woman mentions Blue Eclipse, a name by Any Major City, USA's well congregated nightspot, gives the mood of coolness, flesh, and an urge to hunt. Each image morsel accompanying this inquiry are obscured to alert that this is more than frienly, girlfriend banter. And these are just a few of the unnerving thoughts I'm having mere seconds into who knows what, as I'm all too eager to unpack the crescendo of bubbles that appear on the screen as more women play a sinister, competitive game of... we don't really know. But it reeks of conspiratorial madness!

Writer/director Zena S. Dixon's under two minute short that plays more like a teaser that chomps at the imagination. The urgency of the score and a stylish, nameless driver with a penchant for unconscious bodies, SHE winks with every vague angle and flirtatious texture. We're caught in the thick of action; a group of women bonded by an undoubtedly mischievious task.

As one of the pack with a quick texting thumbs, Dixon assured me there's a bigger story to unfold. I've thoroughly enjoyed her growth and persistence as a filmmaker and know she's got the chops to really let her love for the genre go bonkers here with her own personal touch of sophistication and glamour.

Watch SHE from Zena D. on Vimeo

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