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About


Graveyard Shift Sisters is an online resource dedicated to the scholarship surrounding the experiences, representations, achievements, and creative works of Black women and women of color in the horror and science fiction genres.

The Vision

Engage in discourse on Black horror films: history, understanding older concepts, producing new meanings.

Explore representation of Black women and women of color in horror and science fiction films, TV, books, etc: finding trends, erasing binaries, and exploring the humanity of these bodies.

Discuss horror films, TV, books, etc. on a general note as women of color consumers.

Uncover themes in horror and science fiction unique to the experiences of Black women and women of color.

Expose honest sentiments on how it feels to be a Black female horror fan and artist.


Note: All written work, unless otherwise noted at the top and bottom of each post, is written by creator Ashlee Blackwell.

Logo & Banner design by Jennifer Rodgers

Popular posts from this blog

28 Black Women Horror Filmmakers

1. Zandashé Brown, Blood Runs Down (2018) 2. Raeshelle Cooke, Last Words (2015) 3. Tamara S. Hall, A Night At The Table (2019) 4. R. Shanea Williams, Paralysis (2015) 5. Monica Moore-Suriyage, Black In Red Out (2016)

How MIDSOMMAR Utilizes and Subverts Horror Movie Tropes of People of Color

By Mary Kay McBrayer ( @mkmcbrayer ) For a film that could have been easily white-washed, Ari Aster’s Midsommar does have an inclusive cast. Before our characters are even taken to Sweden where most of the film's dread fueled action takes place, we meet them in their college town. Dani (Florence Pugh) stresses about her sister’s scary email while her boyfriend, Christian (Jack Reynor) drinks at a bar with his buddies, only one of whom is black named Josh ( The Good Place 's William Jackson Harper). I have watched enough horror movies to know—and I’ve been brown enough long enough to know—that this setting does not bode well for a person of color. The token minority, say it with me, tends to die first. Because of this ratio, I expected a few other established tropes of the horror genre in Josh’s character, too, and I have to admit, I was delighted and surprised that nothing played out the way I expected.

DARKLY: At The Heart Of Goth, Is Blackness

"Horror has always been used to illuminate cultural anxieties and gives a voice to our collective fears. So, what to make of the gothic in America, a place which by the very nature of its founding is predisposed to a culture of anxiety? The dread knowing the enemy at the gate is understandable, but in America the enemy has already passed through it, and has been brought inside. The call is coming from inside the house." -words by Leila Taylor